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vocab1 (Talmage vocabulary words) *

The unique vocabulary found in Jesus The Christ, by Elder James E. Talmage


Elder James E. Talmage, an apostle of the Lord Jesus Christ and member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, wrote his landmark book, Jesus The Christ, in the early part of the 20th Century.  Of this work he said, “The spirit of the sacredness inherent in the subject has been a constant companion of the writer throughout his pleasing labor, and he reverently invokes the same as a minister to the readers of the volume.”  He wrote much of the text in a designated room in the Salt Lake Temple.  Elder Talmage’s broad command of and native fluency in the English language is a wonderful part of the experience of reading this book, and words not commonly used in everyday language are to be found on almost every page.  I have listed many of them below, to the edification and education of all.  The definition is followed by two numbers, the first being the page number and the second being the line number where the word is used; for example “appellation – a name or title (35,26)” means that the word appellation is found on page 35, line 26.

Stephen Carter, in the October 2011 edition of Sunstone Magazine, said the following: “One of the challenges in reading any book written by James E. Talmage is grappling with the difficult vocabulary. He uses big words. Really big words. Words like “tesseradecads,” which refers to the arrangement into “groups of fourteen individuals each.” (Jesus the Christ, page 89). Some of my favorite Talmage words include: casuist—someone skilled in judging right from wrong; palliate—to cover with excuses; stultify—to cause another to look foolish.  Words such as these flowed naturally from Talmage, as he was schooled in Latin and German while a student at Brigham Young Academy.  A great many of the difficult words Talmage uses, especially in The Articles of Faith and Jesus the Christ, have a Latin or German root base.  In 1996, I had the opportunity to interview John R. Talmage, who was then, at age 85, the last living child of James and May Talmage. I asked John if his father brought a dictionary to the Salt Lake Temple when he was writing Jesus the Christ. He replied, “Father didn’t use a dictionary. If he didn’t know the meaning of a word, he didn’t use it.”


A-A-A-A-A-A-A-A

  • abhor – regard with disgust and hatred   (194, 13)
  • ablution – a cleansing with water or other liquid, especially as a religious ritual   (151, 38; 366, 4)
  • absolve – set or declare someone free from blame, guilt, or responsibility; exonerate  (31, 31)
  • abject –  experienced or present to the maximum degree, usually of something bad  (105, 35; 235, 31; 308, 17)
  • abrogation – the repeal or abolition of a law, right, or agreement  (196, 18; 235, 32; 278, 43)
  • adduce – cite as evidence   (301, 27)
  • adjuration – an earnest, solemn appeal   (364, 19; 406, 30)
  • admixture – a mixture   (233, 3)
  • affront – an action or remark that causes outrage or offense  (123, 1)
  • aggrandize – increase the power, status, or wealth of; enhance the reputation of someone beyond what is justified by facts  (7, 25; 400, 25)
  • aggrandizement – the act of enlarging or expanding something’s power or status  (64, 24)
  • allure – the quality of being powerfully and mysteriously attractive or fascinating   (429, 14)
  • anathema – a formal curse by a religious authority, excommunicating a person or denouncing a doctrine   (426, 13)
  • antecedent – a preceding circumstance, event, object, style, phenomenon, etc.  (58, 24)
  • antediluvial – of or belonging to the time before the biblical Flood  (32, 8)
  • ante-meridian – before the time of Christ  (52, 25)
  • antemortal – referring to the period of time before mortal existence on earth  (32, 2)
  • antipathy – a deep-seated feeling of dislike; aversion  (68, 8) *
  • aphorism – a pithy observation that contains a general truth, such as, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”   (195, 3; 306, 31)
  • apparition – the appearance of something remarkable or unexpected, typically an image of this type   (336, 13)
  • appellation – a name or title  (35, 26; 65, 2; 140, 21; 143, 10; 218, 9; 229, 10)
  • appellative – a common noun, such as “doctor,” “mother,” or “sir,” used as a vocative   (411, 2)
  • ardor – enthusiasm or passion  (163, 29)
  • arduous – involving or requiring strenuous effort; difficult and tiring   (307, 14)
  • arrogate – take or claim something without justification   (149, 7; 438, 26)
  • ascetic – characterized by severe self-discipline and abstention from all forms of indulgence, typically for religious reasons  (68, 1)
  • asceticism – severe self-discipline and avoidance of all forms of indulgence, typically for religious reasons  (195, 33)
  • aspersion – an attack on the reputation or integrity of someone or something  (169, 30)
  • asseveration – a solemn or emphatic declaration or statement of something   (210, 28)
  • assiduously – with great care and perseverance  (87, 7; 279,27; 401,9)
  • assuage – make an unpleasant feeling less intense  (128, 25)
  • athwart – from side to side of; across, or it can mean in opposition to   (191, 23)
  • atrocity – an extremely wicked or cruel act, typically one involving physical violence or injury   (431, 15)
  • attestation –  a declaration, testimony, or evidence  (53, 1)
  • august – respected and impressive  (9, 7)
  • austerity – sternness or severity of manner or attitude   (146, 33; 257, 27)
  • avarice –  insatiable greed for riches   (155, 16)
  • avaricious – having or showing an extreme greed for wealth or material gain  (124, 4; 226, 2)
  • aver – state or assert to be the case  (67, 10; 140, 3; 161, 22; 221, 7; 245, 27)
  • aversion – a strong dislike or disinclination   (194, 8)
  • avowal – a declaration or statement of support    (270, 4)

B-B-B-B-B-B-B-B

  • behest – an earnest or strongly worded request, a command  (64, 1)  *
  • beneficence – action that is done for the benefit of others   (338, 7)
  • beneficent – generous or doing good   (251, 25; 254, 2; 317, 27)
  • benighted – intellectually or morally ignorant; unenlightened  (56, 13)
  • bereft – deprived of or lacking something, especially a non-material asset  (134, 21; 252, 4)
  • betake – go to, be involved with   (211, 20)
  • bier – movable frame on which a coffin or corpse is placed before burial or cremation or on which it is carried to the grave   (252, 3)
  • boon – something that is helpful or beneficial  (204, 22; 250, 4)
  • bower – a pleasant shady place under trees or climbing plants in a garden or wood   (420, 13)
  • brevity – concise and exact use of words in writing or speech  (111, 13)
  • brook – tolerate or allow something, typically dissent or opposition  (125, 6; 415, 18)
  • brusqueness – being abrupt or offhanded in speech or manner  (123, 32)

C-C-C-C-C-C-C-C

  • calumny – the making of false and defamatory statements in order to damage someone’s reputation; slander   (410, 33)
  • canon – the body of rules, principles, or standards accepted as axiomatic and universally binding in a field of study or art   (284, 26)
  • caprice – a sudden and unaccountable change of mood or behavior   (318, 34)
  • captious – tending to find fault or raise petty objections  (37, 18; 178:1)
  • casuist – a person who studies and resolves moral problems of judgment or conduct arising in specific situations   (292, 30)
  • catechize – instruct someone in the principles of Christian religion using questions and answers; interrogate someone   (385, 34)
  • caustic – sarcastic in a scathing and bitter way   (194, 32)
  • censure – express severe disapproval of someone or something, typically in a formal statement   (317, 27)
  • cogent –  clear, logical, and convincing   (410, 31)
  • cognizant – having knowledge of or being aware of   (343, 25)
  • colloquy  a conversation   (399, 13)
  • collusion – secret or illegal cooperation or conspiracy, especially in order to cheat or deceive others  (127, 6)
  • compass – contrive to accomplish something   (401,14)
  • conduce – help to bring about a particular situation or outcome   (148,27)
  • congruous – in agreement or harmony  (iii, Preface, 15)
  • conjecture – an opinion or conclusion formed on the basis of incomplete information  (108, 23)
  • connivance – willingness to secretly allow or be involved in wrongdoing, especially an immoral or illegal act  (106, 43)
  • consanguinity – relating to or denoting people descended from the same ancestor  (89, 15)  *
  • consort – a wife, husband, or companion  (30, 37)
  • consternation – feelings of anxiety or dismay, typically at something unexpected   (337, 6)
  • construe – interpret a word or action in a particular way   (143, 10; 209, 4)
  • consummate – complete a transaction, an effort, or an attempt; make perfect; make whole  (31, 21)
  • consummation – the completion of a transaction, an effort, or an attempt  (45, 32; 142, 24; 239, 25; 253 20)
  • contemn – treat or regard with contempt or disdain  (30, 10; 62, 7)
  • contemptuous – scornful, insulting, disrespectful   (118, 4)
  • contravening – violating, infringing, or transgressing   (153, 24)
  • contravention – an action that violates a law, treaty, or other ruling   (148, 3)
  • contrition – the state of feeling remorseful and penitent   (238, 16)
  • convivial – cheerful and friendly; jovial   (257, 26)
  • cortege – a solemn procession, especially for a funeral   (251, 31)
  • culpable – deserving blame  (134, 28; 363, 23; 433, 18)
  • cur – an aggressive dog or one that is in poor condition, especially a mongrel; also, an undesirable man  (117, 18; 355, 18)
  • curtly – in a brief, concise, terse, or laconic manner   (156, 1; 305, 23)

D-D-D-D-D-D-D-D

  • dalliance – trifling away of time, dawdling  (61, 33)
  • dearth – a scarcity or lack of something  (9, 34; 379, 16)
  • declivity – a downward slope  (120, 26; 324, 9)
  • defalcation – embezzlement; stealing something you were entrusted with   (394, 28)  *
  • deference – humble submission and respect  (114, 19)
  • deign – do something that one considers to be beneath one’s dignity  (164, 5; 339, 6)
  • demoniac – a person believed to be possessed by an evil spirit   (418, 30)
  • demur – raise doubts or objections or show reluctance  (140, 11; 414, 9)
  • denunciatory – in a manner that includes public condemnation of someone or something  (122, 19; 416, 2)
  • deputation – body of persons appointed or authorized to represent someone else   (150, 37)
  • dereliction – deterioration, ruin, dilapidation  (29, 11; 123, 16)
  • derisive – expressing contempt or ridicule   (341, 30)
  • desecrate – to treat a sacred place or thing with violent disrespect; to violate  (3, 29)
  • devoid – entirely lacking or free from   (147, 30)
  • diabolical – belonging to or so evil as to recall the Devil  (132, 18)
  • disaffection – a state or feeling of being dissatisfied with the people in authority and no longer willing to support them   (343, 25)
  • discomfiture – a feeling of unease or embarrassment; awkwardness   (379, 13; 351, 20; 407, 26)
  • disconcert – to throw into disorder, perturb, confuse   (429, 5)
  • discordant – characterized by quarreling and conflict, a lack of harmony  (109, 25)
  • disdain – consider to be unworthy of one’s consideration  (121, 11; 194, 34)
  • disinclination – a reluctance or lack of enthusiasm   (435, 22)
  • disquiet – induce feelings of anxiety or worry   (295, 7)
  • disrepute – the state of being held in low esteem by the public   (354, 24)
  • dissolution – the act of separating into component parts  (28, 7)
  • divergent – tending to be different or develop in different directions  (102, 15)
  • draught – a single act of drinking or inhaling  (174, 27; 198, 8)
  • drudgery – hard, menial, or dull work   (433, 33)

E-E-E-E-E-E-E-E

  • effrontery – insolent or impertinent behavior  (132, 18)
  • effulgent – shining brightly; radiant   (378, 6)
  • eloquence – fluent or persuasive speaking or writing   (238, 13)
  • elucidate – make something clear; explain   (233, 15)
  • emolument – a salary, fee, or profit from employment or office   (386, 24)
  • enmity – the state or feeling of being actively opposed or hostile to someone or something   (234, 22)
  • enunciation – a clear pronouncement or expression   (210, 21)
  • epithet – an adjective or descriptive phrase expressing a quality characteristic of the person or thing mentioned   (234, 11; 355, 23)
  • epitome – a person or thing that is a perfect example of a particular quality or type   (434, 15)
  • eremitic – relating to a Christian hermit or recluse   (257, 24)
  • erudite – having or showing great knowledge or learning   (249, 17)
  • erudition – knowledge, learning, wisdom   (430, 5)
  • essay – to try or attempt   (154, 29)
  • evanescent – soon passing out of sight, memory, or existence; quickly fading or disappearing   (361, 3)
  • evince – reveal the presence of a quality or feeling  (158, 19; 365, 11)
  • exactitude – the quality of being accurate or correct; precision  (95, 10; 351, 6)
  • excoriate – censure or criticize severely  (125, 8)
  • exigency – an urgent need or demand  (105, 37; 339, 32)
  • expiatory – making amends or reparation for guilt or wrongdoing; atonement  (21, 30; 45, 20)
  • expletive – an oath or swear word  (159, 13; 235, 16)
  • explication – an explanation or interpretation   (287, 9)
  • expositor – a person or thing that explains complicated ideas or theories   (85,16; 285, 14)
  • expostulate – express strong disapproval or disagreement  (170, 18)
  • extant – still in existence; surviving   (99, 21; 224, 16)
  • externalism – excessive regard for outward form in religion   (437, 17)
  • extol – praise enthusiastically   (251, 2)

F-F-F-F-F-F-F-F

  • fain – with pleasure; gladly   (392, 28)
  • fawning – displaying exaggerated flattery or affection; obsequious   (332, 3)
  • fervent – having or displaying a passionate intensity   (435, 31)
  • fervid – intensely enthusiastic or passionate, especially to an excessive degree   (367, 13)
  • festal – of, like, or relating to a celebration or festival  (158, 22)
  • fiat – a formal authorization or proposition; a decree  (131, 18)
  • filial – of or due from a son or daughter   (143, 23; 241, 30; 352, 6)
  • flippant – not showing a serious or respectful attitude   (270, 8)
  • flout – openly disregard a rule, law or convention  (156, 10; 415, 24)
  • fortuitous – lucky, fortunate   (285, 4)
  • founder – sink, be submerged   (308, 12)
  • fraught – of a situation or course of action filled with or destined to result in something undesirable  (124, 28)

G-G-G-G-G-G-G-G

  • germane – relevant to a subject under consideration  (6, 9; 131,17)
  • gladsome – giving or causing joy. delightful   (290, 6)

H-H-H-H-H-H-H-H

  • haggling – bargaining in a petty, quibbling, and often contentious manner   (155, 26)
  • harbinger – a person or thing that announces or signals the approach of another  (125, 12)
  • haughty – arrogantly superior and disdainful  (87, 12)
  • heinous – utterly odious, despicable, or wicked   (268, 26)
  • heinousness – the state of being utterly odious or wicked   (235, 9)
  • heterogeneous – having its source or origin outside the organism; having a foreign origin   (155, 4)
  • historicity – historical authenticity  (1, 11)
  • hoarding – amassing money or valued objects and hiding or storing away   (440, 3)
  • hoary – gray-haired, white-hairedsilver-hairedgrizzled  (20, 11)

I-I-I-I-I-I-I-I

  • ignominious – deserving or causing public disgrace or shame  (20, 4)
  • illumined – lit up; brightened  (102, 4)
  • imbued – inspired or permeated with a feeling or quality   (141, 11)
  • immured – enclosed or confined against one’s will   (270, 27)
  • impeccability – incapable of sinning  (134, 15)
  • impel – to drive, force, or urge someone to do something  (159, 2)
  • impertinent – not showing proper respect; rude   (339, 6; 358, 32)
  • impetuous – acting quickly and without thought or care, impulsive   (336, 15; 317, 19)
  • impious – not showing respect or reverence, especially for a god   (359, 1)
  • implacable – relentless; unstoppable; unforgiving, unsparing  (87, 1; 184:22)
  • importunate – persistent, especially to the point of annoyance or intrusion   (355, 11; 356, 6)
  • importune – to ask someone pressingly and persistently for or to do something   (270, 16)
  • importunity – the act of persistently asking for   (434, 32)
  • impotent – unable to take effective action; helpless or powerless   (362, 9; 410, 32)
  • impugn – dispute the truth, validity, or honesty of a statement or motive; call into question  (202, 30)
  • inalienable – unable to be taken away from or given away by the possessor  (17, 7)
  • incestuous – relating to the crime of having sexual intercourse with a parent, child, sibling, or grandchild   (253, 11)
  • incipience – in an initial stage; beginning to happen or develop   (234, 18; 361, 5)
  • incipient – in an initial stage; beginning to happen or develop   (441, 28)
  • incisive – accurate and sharply focused  (33, 14; 209, 24)
  • incisiveness – with pointedness, with sharp focus   (237, 15)
  • incongruous – not in harmony or keeping with the surroundings or other aspects of something  (197, 18)
  • incredulity – the state of being unwilling or unable to believe something   (141, 15)
  • incubus – a cause of distress or anxiety   (259, 10)
  • inculcate – to implant by repeated statement or admonition; teach persistently and earnestly   (62, 27)
  • incursion – a hostile entrance into or invasion of a place or territory, especially a sudden one, a raid   (292, 20)
  • indigent – poor; needy   (320, 29)
  • indolence – avoidance of activity or exertion; laziness   (297, 17)
  • ineffable – too great or too extreme to be expressed or described in words  (37, 23)
  • inestimable – too great to calculate  (176, 23; 238, 30)
  • inexplicable – unable to be explained or accounted for   (334, 22)
  • inferential – relating to, involving, or resembling inference   (237, 2)
  • infinitesimally – extremely small  (29, 16)
  • infuriate – make someone extremely angry and impatient   (411, 13)
  • inhere – exist essentially or permanently in   (319, 14)
  • inimitable – so good or unusual as to be impossible to copy; unique   (247, 36)
  • inscrutable – impossible to understand or interpret   (148, 29)
  • insidious – proceeding in a gradual, subtle way, but with harmful effects  (128, 21)
  • insinuation – an unpleasant hint or suggestion of something bad  (87, 5; 127, 6))
  • insoluble – incapable of being solved or explained  (53, 38)
  • instanced – cite (a fact, case, etc.) as an instance or example  (32, 22; 296, 22)
  • interdict – prohibit or forbid something   (366, 36)
  • iterations – the repetition of a process or utterance   (238, 5)
  • invective – insulting, abusive, or highly critical language   (410, 33)
  • investiture – the action of formally investing a person with honors or rank  (116, 22; 155, 22)

L-L-L-L-L-L-L-L

  • libation – a drink, beverage, or liquid refreshment  (197, 17)
  • loath – reluctant; unwilling (adjective)   (370, 8)
  • loathsome – hated, disgusting, repulsive   (189, 3)
  • lucid – expressed clearly; easy to understand   (350, 23)

M-M-M-M-M-M-M-M

  • machination – a plot or scheme  (20, 17; 212, 16)
  • malignant – very dangerous or harmful in influence or effect   (288, 1)
  • malignity – malevolence, unkindness   (395, 31)
  • mediation – intervention in a process or relationship; intercession  (26, 8)
  • mendicant – a beggar   (415, 21)
  • mirth – amusement, especially as expressed in laughter   (248, 8)
  • misapprehend – misunderstand words, a person, a situation, etc.   (7, 27)
  • monstrosity – something that is outrageously or offensively wrong   (239, 23)
  • motley – incongruously varied in appearance or character; disparate  (158, 1)
  • munificence – the quality or action of being lavishly generous; great generosity   (250, 6)
  • myriad – a very great or indefinitely great number of persons or things   (292, 1)

N-N-N-N-N-N-N-N

  • nonplussed –  surprised and confused so much that a person is unsure how to react  (157, 20)
  • novitiate – the period or state of being a novice, especially in a religious order  (67, 22)

O-O-O-O-O-O-O-O

  • obduracy – stubbornness, extreme resistance   (436, 22)
  • obdurate – stubbornly refusing to change one’s opinion or course of action   (391, 23)
  • oblivious – not aware of or not concerned about what is happening around one   (262, 7; 409, 17)
  • obstinacy – the quality or condition of being inflexible; stubbornness   (391, 31)
  • odium – general or widespread hatred or disgust directed toward someone as a result of their actions   (194, 25)
  • officious – assertive of authority in an annoyingly domineering way, especially with regard to petty or trivial matters   (405, 24)
  • omniscient – knowing everything   (273, 21)
  • opprobrious – expressing scorn or criticism   (234, 15)
  • ostentation – pretentious and vulgar display, especially of wealth and luxury, intended to impress or attract notice   (237, 2)
  • ostentatious – characterized by haughty or pretentious display; designed to impress or attract notice  (68, 12)
  • ostracize – exclude someone from a society or group   (194, 23)
  • overt – done or shown openly; plainly or readily apparent, not secret or hidden   (429, 7)

P-P-P-P-P-P-P-P

  • paroxysm – a sudden attack or violent expression of a particular emotion or activity   (181, 21; 379, 26)
  • paschal – relating to Easter or to the Jewish Passover  (45, 28)
  • pathos – a quality that evokes pity or sadness  (94, 26)
  • paucity – the presence of something only in small or insufficient quantities or amounts; scarcity  (93, 2; 318, 31)
  • peccability – capable of sinning  (134, 15)
  • pelf – money or wealth, especially when regarded with contempt or acquired by reprehensible means   (155, 1; 417, 34)
  • perennial – perpetual, everlasting, continuing, recurrent   (290, 3)
  • perfidy – deceitfulness; untrustworthiness  (100, 1; 226, 7)
  • perforce – used to express necessity or inevitability   (182, 4)
  • perjury – the offense of willfully telling an untruth in a court after having taken an oath or affirmation  (156, 22)
  • pernicious – having a harmful effect, especially in a gradual or subtle way   (366, 45; 352, 23)
  • plenitude – an abundance, or a situation of being full or complete   (224, 15; 338, 16)
  • portent – a sign or warning that something, especially something momentous or calamitous, is likely to happen  (124, 29; 408, 7)
  • portentous – ominous, done in such a way as to impress or warn  (19, 9; 51, 17; 116, 14; 210, 8; 344, 6)
  • prating – talking foolishly or tediously about something  (122, 21)
  • preferment – promotion or appointment to a position or office  (37,12)
  • prefigure – imagine beforehand or be an early indication or version of something   (219, 10; 356, 13)
  • presage – to be a sign or a warning that something (typically something bad) will happen  (44, 23)
  • presentiment – an intuitive feeling about the future, especially one of foreboding   (439, 27(
  • pretension – a claim or the assertion of a claim to something   (143, footnote)
  • primeval – of or resembling the earliest ages in the history of the world  (4, 5; 111, 32))
  • primogeniture – the state of being the firstborn child  (86, 7)
  • promiscuous – demonstrating or implying an undiscriminating or unselective approach; indiscriminate or casual   (341, 10)
  • promulgate – promote or make widely known an idea or a cause  (65, 15)
  • propensity – an inclination or natural tendency to behave in a particular way   (388, 17)
  • propitiation – the action of appeasing or satisfying a god, spirit, or person  (21, 13; 112, 6)
  • propitious – giving or indicating a good chance of success; favorable  (128, 23)
  • proscription – outlawry, interdiction, or prohibition  (60, 20)
  • protracted – lasting for a long time or longer than expected or usual  (128, 34)
  • provender – food, sustenance   (340, 2)
  • puerile – childishly silly and trivial  (111, 7)
  • pungent – having a sharply strong taste or smell   (432, 20)
  • purlieu – the area near or surrounding a place  (157, 23)
  • purport – appear or claim to be or do something, especially falsely; profess  (128, 11; 129, 18)

Q-Q-Q-Q-Q-Q-Q-Q

  • quail – to withdraw or recoil in fear or fright   (155, 9)
  • querulously – complaining in a petulant or whining manner   (408, 8)
  • query – a question, especially one addressed to an official or organization   (430, 33)
  • quietude – a state of stillness, calmness, and quiet in a person or place   (355, 7)

R-R-R-R-R-R-R-R

  • rank – obnoxious, unsavory   (284, 16)
  • rebuff – reject someone or something in an abrupt or ungracious manner   (210, 4)
  • redress – remedy or compensation for a wrong or grievance   (436, 24)
  • reinteration – the action of repeating something, typically for emphasis or clarity   (372, 8)
  • rejoinder – a reply, especially a sharp or witty one   (195, 7; 416, 2)
  • remonstrance – a forcefully reproachful protest   (368, 44)
  • replete – filled or well-supplied with something  (13, 17)
  • reprobate – morally depraved; unprincipled; bad  (62, 19; 110, 24)
  • repudiate – refuse to accept or be associated with; deny the truth or validity of  (86, 24; 119, 4)
  • resolute – admirably purposeful, determined, and unwavering  (124, 13)

S-S-S-S-S-S-S-S

  • sacrilege – violation or misuse of what is regarded as sacred  (87, 3)
  • sagacity – having or showing keen mental discernment and good judgment; shrewd  (107, 8)
  • salve – soothe, allay, assuage, ease   (431, 28)
  • sanguine – optimistic or positive, especially in an apparently bad or difficult situation
  • sate – satisfy a desire or an appetite to the full  (165, 6)
  • savant – a learned person, especially a distinguished scientist   (342, 28)
  • scathingly – in a manner that is witheringly scornful or severely critical  (122, 19)
  • scrupulous – diligent, thorough, and extremely attentive to details  (195, 32; 351, 6)
  • scrupulously – in a very careful and thorough way  (41, 37; 75, 25; 437, 14)
  • seditious – inciting or causing people to rebel against the authority of a state or monarch   (363, 18)
  • self-abnegation – the denial or abasement of oneself  (164. 10)
  • sententious – given to moralizing in a pompous or affected manner   (299, 13)
  • servility – an excessive willingness to serve or please others  (168, 34)
  • similitude – likeness, resemblance   (285, 23)
  • sodden – soaked with liquid or moisture, saturated   (291, 27)
  • solicitous –  characterized by or showing interest or concern  (178,19)
  • sophistry – the use of fallacious arguments, especially with the intention of deceiving  (131, 14; 233, 3)
  • specious – having a false look of truth or genuineness  (208, 17)
  • spoliation – the action of ruining or destroying something   (231, 11)
  • spurious – not being what it purports to be; false or fake  (120, 1)
  • stultify – cause someone to appear foolish or absurd; also to cause to lose enthusiasm or initiative   (214, 28)
  • subservience – the state of being prepared to obey others unquestioningly   (235, 31)
  • sundry – of various kinds; several   (320, 4)
  • superfluous – unnecessary, especially through being more than enough   (283, 19)
  • superlative – of the highest kind, quality, or order, surpassing all else or others, supreme, extreme   (290, 25; 343,7)
  • suppliant – a person making a humble plea to someone in power or authority   (238, 20)
  • surcease – cessation, stoppage  (203, 7)
  • suzerainty – the domain or area subject to a suzerain, with suzerain being a sovereign or a state exercising political control over a dependent state  (64, 16)

T-T-T-T-T-T-T-T

  • temerity – excessive confidence or boldness; audacity   (341, 8)
  • tersely – in a manner that is sparing in the use of words; abruptly   (146, 14; 410, 31)
  • thraldom – the state of being in slavery or bondage to another person   (366, 28)
  • throes – intense or violent pain and struggle, especially accompanying birth, death, or great change   (324, 30)
  • tractate – a treatise, a written work dealing formally and systematically with a subject  (64, 6)
  • transitorily – temporarily  (27, 34)
  • transmutation – the action of changing or the state of being changed into another form   (146, 2)
  • trenchant – vigorous or incisive in expression or style   (242, 31)

U-U-U-U-U-U-U-U

  • umbrageous – offensive, annoying   (298, 4)
  • unfilial – not having or showing the qualities associated with a son or daughter  (114, 30; 306, 14)
  • universality – the quality of involving or being shared by all people or things in the world or in a particular group  (24, 23)
  • unpalliated – not lessened in severity or intensity, unmitigated   (363, 24)
  • unslaked – not quenched or satisfied  (107, 39)
  • upbraid – find fault with someone; scold, reprimand  (204, 11)
  • upwelling – building up of emotion or gathering strength  (12, 9; 369, 26)

V-V-V-V-V-V-V-V

  • vagary – an unexpected and inexplicable change in a situation or in someone’s behavior   (85,14)
  • vagrant – moving from place to place; wandering, inconstant  (117, 18)
  • vaunted – highly praised, flaunted   (415, 24)
  • veneration – great respect; reverence  (169, 37)
  • verity – a true principle or belief, especially one of fundamental importance; truth  (5, 22; 212, 19))
  • vindication – proof that someone or something is right, reasonable, or justified  (5, 17)
  • vindictiveness – having or showing a strong or unreasoning desire for revenge  (110, 26)
  • virile – having or characterized by strength and energy and drive  (163, 7; 381, 25)
  • vitiate – spoil or impair the quality or efficiency of   (184, 29)

W-W-W-W-W-W-W-W

  • wattled – to be filled with material for making fences, walls, etc., consisting of rods or stakes interlaced with twigs or branches   (420, 14)
  • withal – in addition; as a further factor or consideration  (136, 1; 431, 9)

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